New article in the EXARC Journal

I wrote a brief article about the Bronze Casting Festival for EXARC, a journal dedicated to experimental archaeology and open air museums. This year the EXARC Journal has become open access, so the articles are available for everyone to read.
The article is a condensed version of the experiments and bronze casting that went on at the festival at the Bronzezeithof in Uelsen last May. Those of you who support me through Patreon for $5 per month will have already read this and much more in far more detail.
https://exarc.net/issue-2017-3/mm/bronze-casting-festival-bronzezeithof-uelsen-germany
If you have an interest in experimental archaeology, or are just curious about how people did things in the past, without the benefit of heavy machinery or computers, definitely check out the EXARC journal. There are years’ worth of articles that not only tell you how the pyramids could have been built to how impressions in tiles can tell us about ancient textiles.

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Journals and Books in Archaeology and Craft

Journals

Here are some useful links to academic journals on archaeology. I’ll do my best to make sure the links are current.

Many of the journals linked here are open access, but many aren’t. If you need to access an article, many public libraries do have free access to journals, in addition many universities in the US often allow public access to their libraries. Another resource is to check academia.edu. The site provides open access to articles, theses, dissertations, and conference proceedings.

Note that this is by no means an exhaustive list of the journals out there!

Archaeology

American Journal of Archaeology

Antiquaries Journal

Antiquity

Archaeometry

Assemblage – The Sheffield Graduate Journal of Archaeology (OPEN ACCESS!)

Berkshire Archaeological Journal (OPEN ACCESS!) Note that the journal runs from 1878 to 1980

British Archaeology (OPEN ACCESS!)

Cambridge Archaeological Journal

CBA Research Reports  (OPEN ACCESS!)

Current Archaeology

Derbyshire Archaeological Journal

Discovery and Excavation in Scotland (OPEN ACCESS!)

European Archaeologists 

Expedition

Ethnoarchaeology

EXARC (OPEN ACCESS!)

Internet Archaeology

Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory

Journal of Archaeological Research

Journal of Archaeological Science

Journal of Archaeology of Northwest Europe (OPEN ACCESS!)

Journal of the British Archaeological Association

Journal of Community Archaeology and Heritage

Journal of Conservation & Museum Studies (OPEN ACCESS!)

Journal of Heritage Tourism

Journal of the Historical Metallurgy Society

Journal of Irish Archaeology

Journal of Material Culture

Journal of Open Archaeology Data (OPEN ACCESS!)

Journal of Social Archaeology

Journal of World Prehistory

London Archaeologist (OPEN ACCESS!)

Medieval Archaeology

The Minnesota Archaeologist

Open Access Archaeology Journals (OPEN ACCESS!)

Oxford Journal of Archaeology

Papers from the Institute of Archaeology (OPEN ACCESS!)

PAST (OPEN ACCESS!)

The Post Hole (OPEN ACCESS!)

The Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society (PPS)

Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland (OPEN ACCESS!)

Public Archaeology

Scottish Archaeological Journal

Scottish Archaeology Internet reports (OPEN ACCESS!)

Somerset Archaeological and Natural History

Surrey Archaeological Collections (OPEN ACCESS!)

Sussex Archaeological Collections (OPEN ACCESS!)

Transactions of the Hunter Archaeological Society

Transactions of the Leicestershire Archaeological and Historical Society (OPEN ACCESS!)

Visual Anthropology

World Archaeology

Yorkshire Archaeological Journal

 

Craft

Folklore

The Journal of Modern Craft

World Art

Books

These are a few of the books I’ve found useful. Again, it is nowhere close to being exhaustive, but I plan to update it regularly.

Note: Clicking on the image will take you to Amazon.com where I get a slight kickback if you buy anything when you visit the site (even if it isn’t the same book you clicked on). Yep, this is blatant monetising, but I don’t have advertising on the site and any source of income helps pay the bills for the site. That said, these are all books and authors that I have in my library and highly recommend.

Books on Craft in General

The Craftsman by Richard Sennett is the book to start with for understanding craft, how it works and how it is learned.

The Search for Structure by Cyril Stanley Smith is a joy to read. He explores structure, art, and craftsmanship from an engineering point of view, but also as one who sees the world as a work of craft.
One of my favourite quotes comes from this book:

I asked a blacksmith famous for his superior penknives to tell me the difference between iron and steel. “What’s the difference?” he replied. “What is the difference between an oak tree and the willow—they have different natures and one must adapt to them.” He did not accept the suggestion that some material absorbed from the fire’s charcoal might have something to do with it, and he would not have understood a word of any lecture I could have given him on diffusion, crystal structure, and phase transformations; yet he could make a good knife and I could not. (Smith, 1981, 348)

 

Books on the history of metalworking

 Ronald Tylecote is probably the author to start with when studying archaeo metallurgy. His work covers the beginning of metallurgy to the Industrial Revolution, exploring the development and changes in technology and experimental work with smelting and furnaces.

A history of metallurgy follows the development of metalworking from ancient Egypt (at the time he wrote, these were the earliest known examples) through Medieval Europe. Despite its age, this is the most comprehensive volume on ancient metalworking and a good start in learning the prehistory of metals.

The following two books are nearly identical. Don’t feel as if you are missing out if you don’t own both. Both are excellent references and the chapters are divided by metals, so all the information about copper is provided together, as is silver, tin, gold, lead, and iron.

Books on experimental archaeology

John Coles is the granddaddy of academic experimental archaeology. He did write the book on it, and back in the 1970’s worked to make it a more organised discipline. These books are excellent introductions to experimental archaeology.

Books on metalworking

Knowing archaeological metals is one thing, but knowing how to work with them, their practical properties, and hands-on experience is essential. These are the books that I feel are essential essential guides for practical metalworking.

Tim McCreight’s books are great bench guides that are well organised for quick reference. They are also great textbooks for metalworking.

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Events, Workshops, and Classes

Experimental Archaeology Needs You! Talk and Trunk Show

 Craftspeople! Archaeology Needs You! Learn the magnificent history of out humble shawl pins, and find out how you can contribute to archaeology.

Find out more here

Workshop at Western Illinois University

Tomorrow I’ll be heading down to Macomb, Illinois to run a workshop at Western Illinois University (1-4 November). It will be an exciting event. I will give a couple lectures on experimental archaeology and we’ll do some bronze casting. Lining up the materials long distance has been a bit of a challenge, but it looks as if everything is ready for the workshop.

The staff there are pulling out all the stops. Seeing that my talks will incorporate more than just the interests of the Anthropology Department, the Art Department has also been invited to join in. The local press has been notified, too. It should be an exciting event, and we’ve all been looking forward to it.

The program will be an interesting range of talks and events. Thursday we’ll build the furnace and have a couple short talks about excavating metals, identifying metalworking assemblages, and a repeat of the talk I gave in Oslo about the significance of mistakes in craft work. On Friday I’ll give an hour-long session on experimental archaeology and then we’ll head over to the furnace and get some practical experience pumping bellows and casting bronze. Rather than pack up and leave early Saturday morning, I opted to spend another day there to talk to students some more. Less lecturing and more conversation. I’ve been told that there is one student who is keen on textile archaeology, so I’ll have time to show her the PowerPoint I did at StevenBe.

Getting the supplies for this has strained the budget the department has for visiting lectures, but they are hoping that this will show the university leaders that programs like this provide unique opportunities for students and will open the door for more events. For myself, I would like to see this grow into a longer program, possibly a week-long event, so that students have more time to explore more aspects of experimental archaeology.

For now, this event is run on a shoestring and because I really want to see this happen, I am getting little more than being comped for my transportation, room and board. The ongoing support I get through Patreon makes events like this possible, and the contributions I get go a long way to fund workshops like this that provide educational opportunities for others. If you’re interested in supporting workshops and my work in experimental archaeology, please consider making a donation through PayPal or Patreon.

Talking archaeology at Cyprus Classical Academy 22308836_10159799978290221_763452381345579338_n

Last week I had a great time talking to the students at Cyprus Classical Academy about what archaeologists do. Cyprus Academy is a Montessori school and so the students in each class ranged in age from 6 to 11. They had a chance to look at and handle artefacts, pump a set of bag bellows, and have a go at using a drop spindle to spin some wool. This is a great age for kids to learn about prehistory and the fascinating story of how people invented tools and developed crafts. They will continue on studying prehistory and history, but I doubt they’ll ever think about ‘cave men’ the same way again. Apparently one of the teachers was amazed by finding out that Neanderthals made flutes and had music.

One of the unexpected benefits of my talk was that a girl in the class was excited to know that there are women archaeologists. There is the popular perception that archaeologists are men, and while field archaeology tends to have more men excavating, I pointed out that women also excavate, and also work in labs and museums. I included some slides showing kids volunteering cleaning finds, to let them know that there’s a place for them in archaeology too.

Next month I head down to Western Illinois University to give a couple lectures and to run a bronze casting workshop. It’ll be good to pump bellows again, especially since it’s getting cooler outside these days. I’m also looking forward to introducing a whole new group to archaeological metals.

I am back in the US now and spending some time tanning goat hides to make a set of bellows. This is really starting from scratch!

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Meanwhile I’ll be speaking at Steven Be on the history (and prehistory) of textiles on Sunday 24 September from noon to 2 pm. We’ll start at about 50,000 years ago and wind our way through textile history. I’ll have replica Bronze Age spindle whorls and other items for show and tell (and for sale).

Steven Be is on the corner of 35th Street and Chicago Avenue in Minneapolis. The place is fabulous and must be seen to be believed! We’ll be upstairs with spinners, knitters, and other textile artists. Details can be found linked here.

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The EXARC Journal is now Open Access! This is a big step and great news for researchers in experimental archaeology, or for people who are interested in ancient technology and techniques. In the past articles were made available after two years, now they are available on publication.

The journal is available for free now, but there are a lot of benefits of joining EXARC. The most important reason is to support the work EXARC does in promoting Open Air Museums, living history, museum studies, and experimental archaeology. Membership will get a print version of the journal, in addition to a card that gives you free admittance to museums who are associated with ICOM. To see a full list of the extensive work the organisation does, check out the link here.

In 2014 I presented a paper at the 8th Annual EXARC Conference in Oxford. Getting Hammered is about the experimental work I did using Bronze Age replica hammers and comparing the hammers I used to the ones I examined in museums. The article is available online now at this address.

To celebrate this, I am putting up the Powerpoint and notes from the 2014 presentation on my Patreon site. It will be available for all supporters who contribute $3 or more per month. The contributions made to my Patreon page go to fund my experimental work, including my participation in the recent Bronze Casting Festival in Uelsen, Germany.

 

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